User Tools

Site Tools


3D Printing : Best Practices and Approaches

Click for original

Product Name: 3D Printing : Best Practices and Approaches
Product ID: 64631
Published Artist(s): Digital Art Live, magbhitu
Created By: N/A
Release Date: 2019-10-27

Product Information

  • Required Products: None

What is 3D printing? How does it work? What are its key benefits if you craft your own 3D digital models?

The concept of 3D printing can be traced back to when the sci-fi author, Arthur C. Clarke, was the first to describe the basic functions of a 3D printer in 1964. The first actual 3D printer appeared in 1987, where there was a view to using them in the industry for design prototyping. Fast forward to today and you can get hold of a personal 3D printer at just a few hundred dollars.

This tutorial is for digital artists that are curious about 3D printing and how it may apply to them. John Haverkamp shows you why he took up 3D printing, how a 3D printer works, how to prepare a 3D model for printing, making the best use of a personal 3D printer and the typical “postwork” required on a 3D printed model. He'll even show how a model with ball and socket joints can be taken through the process. The session includes a webcam feed of John Haverkamp's studio as he shows you the Creality CR-10 Mini printer, the models he's created, the cleanup and painting processes.

Software used in this workshop: ZBrush and the open-source software Ultimaker Cura (for 3D printing).

Why 3D Printing?

John's story of why he took up 3D printing
The benefits of 3D printing for the digital artist
How fast is 3D printing?
Why John selected the Creality CR-10 mini
ZBrush Mesh Preparation

Airtight mesh
Eliminating thin parts
Flat bottoms
Separating into multiple meshes and creating keys so they snap together
Simple ball and socket joint for action figures
Printing with the Creality CR-10 Mini

Filament types PLA vs ABS
Using the Creality CR-10 Mini
Ultimaker Cura settings
Mesh Alignment considerations
Cleanup

Removing supports
Gluing
File and Rotary tools refinement
Painting

Priming
Dry-brushing
Model paints and inks
Metallic paint additives
About John Haverkamp

John Haverkamp was born in Ohio and then moved to the pristine Blue Ridge Mountains of Virginia at a young age. There he spent a semi-isolated childhood re-enacting the Lord of the Rings and being corrupted by Dungeons and Dragons. Always with the fondness for the fantastical and medieval, Art school drove him deeper into Luddite territory by granting him the skills of a traditional metal-smith. This meant post-college jobs making copper fountains, welding and steel fabricating, casting and finishing bronze sculptures, and working for an architectural blacksmith throughout his twenties.

Digitally, John got sucked into cyberspace and the arcane mysteries of 3D studio max. The perfect software match for John was Zbrush discovered six years ago. Now he teaches digital arts part-time, and constantly endeavors to improve his craft as a digital-sculptor and visualizer through personal work, illustration and indie game projects.

Product Notes

Installation Packages

Below is a list of the installation package types provided by this product. The name of each package contains a Package Qualifier (WIP), which is used as a key to indicate something about the contents of that package.

  • 2 Core

[ ] = Optional, depending on target application(s)

Not all installation packages provide files that are displayed to the user within the interface of an application. The packages listed below, do. The application(s), and the location(s) within each application, are shown below.

Additional Details

Resolved Issues

  • None

Known Issues

  • None

Support

Visit our site for technical support questions or concerns.