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This page exists within the Old ArtZone Wiki section of this site. Read the information presented on the linked page to better understand the significance of this fact.

Pinning Options

When you transform a body part, it sometimes moves other body parts at the same time. However, you can use pins to prevent selected body parts from being moved or changed accidentally.

It is not necessary to pin a bone. If no bones are pinned, then the figure’s root bone (the hip in most figures) will act as the pinned bone. After you pin another bone on a figure, the parent bone (such as the hip) moves freely as part of the pose as long as it lies between a pinned bone and the bone that you are manipulating.

It’s easy to figure out what happens when you pin certain bones. Simply pin the bones you want to keep in place, then click and hold the bone you want to move (just don’t move the mouse.) You will then see exactly which bones will be affected.

Caution graphic CAUTION! Pinning every bone on an entire figure and then trying to move a bone on that figure is quite likely to cause program instability.

Pinning options are shown below and work as follows:

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  • Toggle Pins: This button will pin all currently selected figure bones into an absolute point in space. If any or all of the selected bones are already pinned when this button is pressed, then the button will remove those pins.
  • Un-Pin All: This button will remove any and all existing pins on the selected figure.
  • Pin Position: This drop-down menu will allow you to determine the behavior of all pinned bones, by letting you set exactly what part of the pinned bone you want fixed in space. The options are as follows:
    • Pin at Origin: This option pins the bone at a point that is closest to its parent bone. For example, a shin bone will be fixed at the knee, a foot will be fixed at the ankle, or a forearm will be fixed at the elbow. The pinned bone pivots at the joint closest to its parent. Pinned bones that do not have a parent, such as a hip, will pivot at the center.
    • Pin at Ends: This option pins the bone at the point that is farthest from its parent bone. For example, a shin bone will be fixed at the ankle, a foot will be fixed at the toes, or a forearm will be fixed at the wrist. The pinned bone pivots at the joint furthest from its parent. Pinned bones with no children (such as fingertips) will pin at their origin if this option is selected. Pinned bones with multiple ends (such as the Hip and Chest) will pin at all ends.
    • Pin at Both: This option holds both ends of the bone(s) in a fixed position, effectively fixing the entire bone in absolute space. It will not pivot or change position at all in PowerPose unless pushed to extremes.